Two weeks before my hip replacement, I went to my pre-op appointment which included a group class. I didn’t think much about it until I walked into a room with 25 other people who didn’t look anything like me. They were much older, bigger, and in worse shape, with canes, walkers, and wheelchairs.

After the class, I was issued my “aides”, including a raised toilet seat, shower chair and walker. I immediately protested saying, Do I really need all of this? I mean, I’m in pretty good shape and… Then I remembered, oh yeah, this time I’m not the nurse, I’m not the caregiver, I’m not the friend soliciting advice, I’m not in charge. I’m the patient. I’m the one who is receiving the guidance and expertise for my new hip.

I decided that moment for me to have the best possible outcome with my surgery would require me to let go of my ego. The ego who thinks I’m in too good of shape to need aides; the ego who thinks I’m different than everyone else just because I don’t share the same size or birthdate; the ego who thinks I really don’t need a hip replacement because I am a yogi and should be able to heal myself.

The ego doesn’t always serve us because it is impatient, stubborn, negative, and keeps us in struggle with it’s delusions. Once we stop fueling our ego by letting go of expectations, judgment, and attachment , it will start to dissolve. The next time you notice your ego taking over, here are 3 words you can say to let it go.

  • I need help
  • I don’t know
  • I am sorry
  • I was wrong
  • I miss you

We can’t completely get rid of the ego, (and we actually need it sometimes), we just don’t need to be driven by it, with a health issue, relationship, work situation, or financial crisis.

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